The Innocence of Father Brown

June 16, 2016 - Comment

”G. K. Chesterton’s tales [are] of the unassuming Catholic priest who claims that his work at the confessional (where he has to do ‘next to nothing but hear men’s real sins’) puts him in an excellent position to solve the bizarre crimes that come his way in pre-First World War England . . . The

Buy Now! $9.15Amazon.com Price
(as of October 21, 2017 6:10 am UTC - Details)

”G. K. Chesterton’s tales [are] of the unassuming Catholic priest who claims that his work at the confessional (where he has to do ‘next to nothing but hear men’s real sins’) puts him in an excellent position to solve the bizarre crimes that come his way in pre-First World War England . . . The unassuming cleric, whose humble conviction that his God will eventually triumph over the souls of even the most evil of criminals, is the quiet but insistent heartbeat of these unusual exercises in detective fiction.” –Sunday Times

Twelve mysteries featuring Father Brown, the short, stumpy Catholic priest with “uncanny insight into human evil.” From London to Cornwall, then to Italy and France, a short, shabby priest takes on bandits, traitors, and killers. Why is he so successful? The reason is that after years spent in the priesthood, Father Brown knows human nature and is not afraid of its dark side.

Between the silver ribbon of morning and the green glittering ribbon of sea, the boat touched Harwich and let loose a swarm of folk like flies, among whom the man we must follow was by no means conspicuous—nor wished to be. There was nothing notable about him, except a slight contrast between the holiday gaiety of his clothes and the official gravity of his face. His clothes included a slight, pale grey jacket, a white waistcoat, and a silver straw hat with a grey-blue ribbon. His lean face was dark by contrast, and ended in a curt black beard that looked Spanish and suggested an Elizabethan ruff. He was smoking a cigarette with the seriousness of an idler. There was nothing about him to indicate the fact that the grey jacket covered a loaded revolver, that the white waistcoat covered a police card, or that the straw hat covered one of the most powerful intellects in Europe. For this was Valentin himself, the head of the Paris police and the most famous investigator of the world; and he was coming from Brussels to London to make the greatest arrest of the century.

Contents

The Blue Cross The Secret Garden The Queer Feet The Flying Stars The Invisible Man The Honour of Israel Gow The Wrong Shape The Sins of Prince Saradine The Hammer of God The Eye of Apollo The Sign of the Broken Sword The Three Tools of Death

Comments

Patricia Harrelson says:

The Best Mystery Write EVER I read this on the recommendation of my 14 year old grandson who claims Chesterton is the best mystery writer EVER! My grandson just might be right. Clearly Chesterton is a highly intelligent story-crafter. This collection of short stories about Father Brown kept me awake and alert and ALWAYS surprised regarding the outcome. There was nothing formulaic or predictable in these stories. Father Brown is delightful in a Columbo fashion (perhaps the TV detective was modeled after him), and his…

Michele L. Worley says:

Introducing Father Brown The 12 stories herein can of course be found in THE COMPLETE FATHER BROWN, and THE ANNOTATED INNOCENCE OF FATHER BROWN. This is the first Brown collection, which introduces not only Father Brown himself but Flambeau, the daring thief. Father Brown worked on Flambeau during their early confrontations, and eventually persuaded him to give up his life of crime. He became Father Brown’s friend and sometime sidekick, and appears in three-quarters of the stories herein, in one capacity or…

Axver says:

A wonderful collection of stories G. K. Chesterton had a writing ability that is nothing short of extraordinary. He could craft landscapes, settings, and locations with vivid textures, and possessed a cunning knack that made the ordinary seem thoroughly outlandish and the peculiar rather tame. This collection of short mysteries aptly shows off his skill as a writer; whereas most authors would use an entire novel to build tension, cultivate atmosphere, and weave a complex mystery, Chesterton could do all that in a few brief…

Comments are disabled for this post.

Copyright © 2017 agathachristiebooks.com. All Rights Reserved.